Oct. 24, 2018

Watch: Data integration and interactive use of HBP`s brain Atlas systems

With new high-resolution methods neuroscientists have been able to generate massive amounts of data about the healthy and diseased brain. But so far, this wealth of information in neuroscience has by far surpassed the ability to integrate and make sense of it. The HBP atlas systems offer a way to integrate vast and heterogeneous neuroscience data into common frameworks and better understand the multilevel organization of the brain.

With new high-resolution methods neuroscientists have been able to generate massive amounts of data about the healthy and diseased brain. But so far, this wealth of information in neuroscience has by far surpassed the ability to integrate and make sense of it. 

The HBP atlas systems offer a way to integrate vast and heterogeneous neuroscience data into common frameworks and better understand the multilevel organization of the brain.

A new video featuring the leader of HBP`s Neuroinformatics Platform, Prof. Jan Bjaalie, explains the key principles of HBP workflows used for registration of data into common reference atlases. Find out how scientists can use the HBP Research Infrastructure to contextualize, relate and analyze their data. The workflows shown apply to both the rodent and human brain atlas systems of the HBP.

Literature: Bjerke et al.: Data integration through brain atlasing: Human Brain Project tools and strategies. European Psychiatry 2018, “Editor’s Choice”.

A second video demonstrates the different interactive capabilities scientists can use to explore the multi-level brain human brain atlas.

The Human Brain Project hosts a rich web-based 3D atlas viewer („NeHuBa“), that is capable of displaying very large brain volumes, including oblique slicing, a whole brain overview, surface meshes, and maps. It allows to interactively choose difference template spaces and reference parcellations, find brain areas by name or visual selection, and browse additional region-specific multimodal data. The rendering of large volumetric data builds on the opensource project neuroglancer.

Some important atlases and templates can be directly accessed, including the „Big Brain“ (Amunts et al., Science 2013) the JuBrain cytoarchitectonic atlas and the Waxholm Space Atlas of the Sprague Dawley Rat Brain.

For more, see:

https://www.humanbrainproject.eu/en/explore-the-brain/