6th HBP Student Conference on Interdisciplinary Brain Research

 

22–25 February 2022

Virtual Event

Download the Preliminary Scientific Programme

 

 




FAQ's and all you need to know
 

Registration for virtual participation

  • Admission to scientific sessions available for virtual participation
  • Admission to workshops available for virtual participation
  • Conference material

Lately, we have received information about emails from third party service providers that ask speakers or participants of the conference to confirm their hotel reservation. Please note that we do not offer such services or maintain any collaborations with such service providers. Any communication in regards to the conference will be sent to you by education@humanbrainproject.eu
 

 

The conference will start on Tuesday 22 February 2022 at 2:00 PM CET and will end in the afternoon of Friday 25 February 2022. The programme comprises keynote lectures, student sessions, poster sessions, workshops as well as social events.

 

Registration fee waivers are available for a limited number of participants in financial need that want to partake in the conference.

To apply for a fee waiver, please send an email to education@humanbrainproject.eu with a short explanation (max. 200 words).

 

The link to our virtual conference platform as well as the online credentials will be sent out to all registered participants a few days prior to the conference.

 

To make this virtual conference an interactive experience, it is important that you have access to a stable internet connection, good audio (with microphone) and ideally (not mandatory) a webcam for video communication.

Also, to have the full conference experience it is important that you have installed the Zoom Desktop Client application (v5.7.0 or higher) and that you access the conference platform via the latest version of Google Chrome

 

Submitters whose abstract have been accepted for a poster presentation can find the virtual poster guidelines  here.

The presenting author of your abstract has received detailed information via email. Make sure to check your spam folder. If you did not receive an email, urgently contact education@humanbrainproject.eu


Important deadlines for presenting authors:

Register for the conference until 21 January 2022 (In case you cannot participate physically, inform the HBP Education Office by 15th January 2022 via email)

Fill in the recording and abstract permission online form until 21 January 2022

Send your final poster to education@humanbrainproject.eu until 7 February 2022

As the Covid-19 situation will not allow us to meet physically, the conference will be moved fully virtually. Participants who registered for on-site participation will receive a refund for the difference of the online participation fee.


 

In light of the current Covid-19 situation, the organizers of the 6th HBP Student Conference have decided to move the event to a fully virtual format. All participants that have already purchased an on-site ticket will be refunded for the difference of the online participation fee.

 

The human brain is such a complex system that it can only be understood by combining knowledge and practices from multiple scientific fields. The 6th HBP Student Conference provides an open forum for the exchange of new ideas among early career researchers working across various scientific fields relevant to the Human Brain Project (HBP). Attendees will be exposed to the data-driven and multidisciplinary brain research approach of the HBP and will have the opportunity to use the EBRAINS research infrastructure. The conference will provide space for extensive scientific dialogue (both intra- and interdisciplinary) amongst peers and faculty through a variety of discussion sessions, lectures, workshops & hands-on training sessions and social events. It will take place as a virtual event, organised and supported by the HBP Education Programme.  

The 4-day conference will be held virtually from 22–25 February 2022.


Participation in the 6th HBP Student Conference is open to the entire student community and early career researchers, regardless of whether they are affiliated with the HBP or not. Participants without contributions to the scientific programme are also welcome. We encourage all young scientists to register and aim for an equal representation of all genders.


Registration

As part of the registration process, you can also choose which workshop(s) you would like to attend. Make sure to check out the workshop descriptions before registering.

Registration deadline: 7 February 2022
 

 

Registration information & fees 
 
  Registration for virtual participation
Students € 30.00
Regular participants € 30.00

 

In light of the current Covid-19 situation, the organizers of the 6th HBP Student Conference have decided to move the event to a fully virtual format. All participants that have already purchased an on-site ticket will be refunded for the difference of the online participation fee.


What is covered by the registration fee?
 

Registration for virtual participation

  • Admission to scientific sessions available for virtual participation
  • Admission to workshops available for virtual participation
  • Conference material

Please note: Registration for the conference is mandatory!


Payment modalities

Payment of registration fees can be made in EURO in the form of

  • Credit or debit card
  • PayPal
  • Sofort
  • Sepa Direct Debit


Confirmation of registration

After the registration has been completed you will receive an automatically generated notification via email. If you need an invoice, please contact education@humanbrainproject.eu
 

Cancellations and refunds

Notice of cancellation has to be made in writing via email to the HBP Education Programme Office to: education@humanbrainproject.eu. The policy for refunding registration fees is as follows:

Written cancellation received:

before 15 December 2022: 80% refund
before 7 February 2022: 50% refund
from 8 February 2022: no refund.

No refunds will be granted for unattended events or early termination of attendance, in case of cancellation of speakers, lack of space in the conference room, or any other incidents during the conference that are beyond the control of the conference organisers.

If the event due to changing Covid-19 restrictions has to be held fully virtual, participants who registered for on-site participation will receive a refund for the difference of the online participation fee.

 

Modification of the programme

The conference organisers reserve the right to modify the programme. No refunds can be granted in case of cancellation of speakers, lack of space in the conference room, or any other incidents during the conference that are beyond the control of the conference organisers.

 

Cancellation of the conference

In the event that the conference cannot be held or is postponed due to events beyond the control of the conference organisers (force majeure) or due to events that are not attributable to wrongful intent or gross negligence of the conference organisers, the conference organisers cannot be held liable by delegates for any damages, costs, or losses incurred, such as transportation costs, accommodation costs, costs for additional orders, financial losses, etc.
 

 
Logistics


Accommodation

Lately, we have received information about emails from third party service providers that ask speakers or participants of the conference to confirm their hotel reservation. Please note that we do not offer such services or maintain any collaborations with such service providers. Any communication in regards to the conference will be sent to you by education@humanbrainproject.eu
 

 

Practical information


Time zone

Innsbruck is located in the Central European Time Zone (CET = GMT+1).


Please note that the information provided on this site has been obtained from several different sources and therefore the organisers cannot accept any responsibility for errors therein.

 


Preliminary Scientific Programme

This programme will be updated regularly and is subject to change. 

Download the Preliminary Scientific Programme

Detailed workshop descriptions

13:15 – 14:00
Virtual Welcome Coffee
 
14:00 – 14:30
Welcome
 
14:30 – 15:30
Keynote I - The power of the mind: No-nonsense meditation for brain scientists
Steven Laureys | University of Liège
 
15:30 – 16:00
Coffee break
 
16:00 – 17:00
Student Session I: Brain atlases & clinical neuroscience
 
17:00 – 17:15
Coffee break
 
17:15 – 18:15
Keynote II - Neuromorphic Computing
Mike Davies | Intel
 
18:15 – 18:30 
Coffee break
 
18:30 – 19:30
Networking Session (Hybrid)
 
19:30
End of day
 

 

10:00 – 11:30
Parallel Workshops:
 

Establishing interdisciplinary collaborations in the EBRAINS Community
Lars Klüver, Sara Christina Martinez, Aske Palsberg, Natalie Roosta | Danish Board of Technology

 

Introducing the Arbor simulator: what’s new and hands-on tutorial
Brent F.B. Huisman | Forschungszentrum Jülich

 

Let’s explore EBRAINS! – And discover how your scientific use case can be realized
Claudia Bachmann, Marissa Diaz
 | Forschungszentrum Jülich

 

Now you see it! Visualization and modeling tools for neuroscience on EBRAINS
Óscar David Robles Sánchez, Susana Mata Fernández | Universidad Rey Juan Carlos
Sandra Diaz | Forschungszentrum Jülich

 

The Brain Scaffold Builder: a new framework for realistic brain modelling (the cerebellar use case)
Claudia Casellato, Alice Geminiani, Robin De Schepper | University of Pavia
 

Detailed workshop descriptions
 

11:30 – 11:45
Coffee break
 
11:45 – 12:45
Keynote III - The strategic alliance between neuroscience and robotics
Silvia Tolu | Technical University of Denmark
 
12:45 – 13:45
Lunch break
 
13:45 – 14:45
Round table discussion
 
14:45 – 15:15
Coffee break
 
15:15 – 16:30
Student Session II: Brain simulation & brain inspired architectures
 
16:30 – 16:45
Coffee break
 
16:45 – 18:15
Poster Session I
 
18:15
End of day
 

 

10:00 – 11:30


Parallel Workshops:
 

Bio-inspired deep learning with Norse and PyTorch
Christian Pehle | Heidelberg University
Jens E. Pedersen | KTH Stockholm

 

Brain Research for Good: Addressing dual use of concern & misuse issues
 Inga Ulnicane | De Montfort University
Manuel Guerrero | Uppsala University

 

Inclusive Success! How to develop your career by successfully networking within - and across - university structures and procedures
Karin Grasenick, Julia Trattnig | convelop cooperative knowledge design gmbh

 

The EBRAINS Collaboratory
Marc Morgan | EBRAINS

 

Detailed workshop descriptions
 

11:30 – 11:45
Coffee break
 
11:45 – 12:45
Keynote IV - Brain Anatomy and Connectivity
Svenja Caspers | Forschungszentrum Jülich

 
12:45 – 13:45
Lunch break
 
13:45 – 14:45
Keynote V - Multi-scale modelling of resting-state activity in human and non-human primate cortices
Sacha von Albada | Forschungszentrum Jülich
 
14:45 – 15:15
Coffee break
 
15:15 – 16:15
Student Session III: Brain organisation & theoretical neuroscience
 
16:15 – 16:30
Coffee break
 
16:30 – 18:00
Networking Session
 
18:00
End of day
 

 

10:00 – 11:30
Poster Session II
 
11:30 – 11:45
Coffee break
 
11:45 – 12:45


Student Session IV: Systems & cognitive neuroscience

12:45 – 13:45
Lunch break
 
13:45 – 14:45
Keynote VI - The brain and its mind - The need for philosophy
Georg Northoff | The Royal Institute of Mental Health Research, University of Ottawa
 
14:45 – 15:15
Closing and Awards
 
15:15 
End of Conference
 

 

Svenja Caspers studied medicine, business studies and economics. After finalizing her MD thesis on the microarchitecture of the human inferior parietal lobule and conducting her PhD on neural resources of decision making, she focused her postdoc phase at the Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine of the Research Centre Jülich (Germany) on the structure-function relationship in human association cortices, using multimodal magnetic resonance imaging and postmortem microscopy techniques. In 2012, she became team leader for 1000BRAINS, a large population-based cohort study on variability of brain structure, function and connectivity of the aging brain in the Research Centre Jülich. Her research focus thus moved towards brain aging research in light of environmental and lifestyle influencing factors in large cohorts, using high-throughput analyses via high-performance computing facilities. Becoming an Associate Professor for Connectivity in the Human Brain at the University of Düsseldorf (Germany) as well as group leader of the Connectivity Group and Deputy Director in the Research Centre Jülich in 2015, she is now (since 2018) Full Professor for Anatomy and Director of the Institute for Anatomy I at the University of Düsseldorf, continuing her position in Jülich. Since 2020, she is holds the position as Vice Dean for Teaching and Study Quality at the Medical Faculty of the University Düsseldorf. In 2021, she was appointed to the National Academy of Sciences Leopoldina.

Keynote talk: Interindividual variability of brain phenotypes – towards population neuroimaging & brain models

The human brain as well as the respective cognitive abilities show a pronounced interindividual variability which are considerably evident during the aging process and thus in the older adult brain. Influences beyond the factor ‘age’ itself need to be considered when trying to understand this variability in brain structure, function and connectivity. These include genetic as well as lifestyle and environmental factors and their complex interplay. Since the effect of each single factor might be small, large population-based cohorts are needed to capture these individual influences. The talk will show some examples from a large cohort of older subjects of the Research Centre Jülich, the 1000BRAINS study, as well as the German National Cohort (NAKO). Examples will demonstrate the relevance and interplay of different influencing factors on brain structure, function and connectivity and will discuss the effects of data pooling as compared to large homogeneous studies. Current efforts within the HBP in terms of modelling population variability in aging and the usability of EBRAINS to interpret and integrate such data using the multilevel atlas will be exemplified.

 

Mike Davies is Director of Intel’s Neuromorphic Computing Lab. Since 2014 he has been researching neuromorphic architectures, algorithms, software, and systems, and has fabricated several neuromorphic chip prototypes to date, including the Loihi series.  He was a founding employee of Fulcrum Microsystems and Director of its silicon engineering group until Intel’s acquisition of Fulcrum in 2011.  He led the development of four generations of low latency, highly integrated Ethernet switches using Fulcrum’s proprietary asynchronous design methodology. He received B.S. and M.S. degrees from Caltech in 1998 and 2000, respectively.

Keynote talk: New Tools for a New Era of Neuromorphic Computing

It’s time to pick up the pace in neuromorphic computing. While the field has seen a lot of progress over the past four years, neuromorphic computing continues to face challenges at the hardware, algorithmic, and software levels.  At Intel, we recently launched our next-gen neuromorphic chip, Loihi 2, and the Lava open source software framework, both offered to help researchers around the world tackle these challenges.  We see a future with a new class of programmable computing device, sitting alongside CPUs and GPUs, that brings breakthroughs to intelligent systems operating under power, data, and latency constraints.  This talk outlines a path to fulfilling this vision and describes how you can apply brain-inspired ideas, using Loihi 2 and Lava, to help hasten a new era in computing.

 

Professor Steven Laureys is a world-renowned neurologist who has been researching states of consciousness with his team for more than twenty years. Director of research at the FNRS, Dr Laureys is founding director of the GIGA Consciousness & Brain Centre (University and University Hospital of Liège). Most of his work as a clinician scientist is devoted to the study of alterations in consciousness in brain-injured patients.

Keynote talk: The power of the mind: No-nonsense meditation for brain scientists

Dr Steven Laureys here exposes the effects of mindfulness on our body and on our mind. Through this team’s research on the brain of the monk Matthieu Ricard, he illustrates how meditation stimulates brain function and modifies it in a positive way. But you don't have to be a Buddhist to experience the positive changes in meditation. The resulting benefits for our mental health - less stress, better sleep, more focus, less anxiety, antidepressant and pain relieving effects ... - are within our grasp. During this videoconference, Steven explains our current knowledge of the action of meditation on our neurons, and offers simple and effective meditation exercises. Yes, meditation can change our lives, just as it has changed the lives of Steven Laureys and many of the patients he follows!

Georg Northoff is a philosopher, neuroscientist and psychiatrist, holding degrees in all three disciplines. He works in Ottawa/Canada holding a Canada Research Chair for Mind, Brain Imaging, and Neuroethics. His research focuses on the relationship between brain and mind. The question driving him is: “why and how can our brain construct mental features like self, consciousness, etc.”  

He is one of the leading figures in linking philosophy, psychiatry, and neuroscience having developed non-reductive neurophilosophy. He authored over 300 journal articles and 18 books which are translated into several languages including “Neuro-philosophy and the Healthy Mind” (2016) Norton Publisher, and “Code of Time” (Il Mulino, 2021).

All papers etc, can be found on the website:
www.georgnorthoff.com

See recent Podcast for broader audience: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lDX3xOVHB18&t=237s

Keynote talk: The brain and its mind - The need for philosophy

Neuroscience investigates the neural basis of mental features which traditionally have been discussed in philosophy. This means that we still encounter conceptual definition from philosophy in current neuroscience. Can we transfer the philosophical definition to the brain? And how do we need to consider the brain in order to take into view mental features like self and consciousness including their changes in psychiatric disorders? My talk addresses these issues by showing specific examples how our models of brain and mind shape our empirical and experimental approaches (and vice versa). 

Assoc. Prof. Silvia Tolu currently leads the Neurorobotics team at the Technical University of Denmark (DTU). She holds a Ph.D. degree in Neuromorphic Computing from the University of Granada (Spain). Her main research experience is in bio-inspired control for robots, compliant human-robot interactions, computational models of the cerebellum, and machine learning. Her research focuses on developing brain-based methods and technologies for enabling autonomy in robots while they act in realistic, dynamic, and rich sensory environments. Her vision is to open revolutionary robotics paradigms and to discover novel methods for diagnosis and rehabilitation of neuro-degenerative diseases. In 2016, she was granted with an IF-EF H2020 Marie Sklodowska-Curie Fellowship (BIOMODULAR, Project ID: 70510 2017-2019). She has been principal investigator in the Co-Design Project 2 (CDP2 Human Brain Project HBP-SGA2) about cerebellar implementations in robotic systems (2018-2020). Silvia has published in influential journals and proceedings in both robotics and computational neuroscience and has served as reviewer for top-ranked conferences and journals. She is currently in the Editorial Board of Frontiers Neurorobotics.

Keynote talk: The strategic alliance between Neuroscience and Robotics

Over recent years, Neuroscience and Robotics have strengthen an alliance with the aim to provide insights into how biological brains process sensory data and provide motor control. In this talk, I will discuss a number of principles to consider when designing neurorobotics systems to test brain theories. In particular, I will refer to the embodied intelligence principle that refers to the capability of living systems to learn, act, and adapt during interactions with dynamic environments. Some of the recent achievements in Neuro-Robotics will be presented together with some potential directions for the development of future brain-based technologies.

Sacha van Albada is Deputy Leader of WP3, Junior Professor for Computational Neuroanatomy at the University of Cologne, and leader of the group "Theoretical Neuroanatomy" at Research Center Jülich, Germany. She obtained a Bachelor of Science degree from University College Utrecht, the Netherlands, followed by a Master's in Theoretical Physics from Utrecht University, and a PhD at the School of Physics at the University of Sydney, Australia. Her group combines anatomical and physiological data from a wide range of sources to build neural network models of mammalian cerebral cortex. The aim is to understand relationships between cortical structure and dynamics, and to provide models that serve as platforms for further refinement and for incorporating cortical function.

 

Keynote talk: Multi-scale modelling of resting-state activity in human and non-human primate cortices

To date, models of the cerebral cortex have seldom combined accounts of the dynamics in local cortical circuits with large-scale activity patterns across multiple areas. I will present supercomputational simulation studies of resting-state activity in macaque and human cerebral cortices which bring together microscopic and macroscopic descriptions of the structure and dynamics. The simulations reproduce key aspects of spiking statistics as well as patterns of fMRI functional connectivity, and support the notion that cerebral cortex is poised just below a state transition. The models can serve as platforms for testing theories of cortical function in a setting constrained by anatomical and physiological data at multiple scales.

 

 

 
Confirmed Workshop Tutors: 

Detailed workshop descriptions

Claudia Bachmann | Forschungszentrum Jülich
Claudia Casellato | University of Pavia
Robin de Schepper | University of Pavia
Sandra Diaz | Forschungszentrum Jülich
Alice Geminiani | University of Pavia
Grasenick Karin | convelop cooperative knowledge design gmbh
Manuel Guerrero | Uppsala University
Brent Huisman | Forschungszentrum Jülich
Lars Klüver | Danish Board of Technology
Sara Martinez | Danish Board of Technology
Susana Marta Fernández | Universidad Rey Juan Carlos
Marc Morgan | EPFL
Aske Palsberg | Danish Board of Technology
Jens Egholm Pedersen | KTH Royal Institute of Technology
Christian Pehle | University of Heidelberg
Óscar David Robles-Sánchez  | Universidad Rey Juan Carlos
Natalie Roosta | Danish Board of Technology
Julia Trattnig | convelop
Inga Ulnicane | De Montfort University
 

Ask me Anything Session: 

As a young scientist you want to work within neuroscience. Often enough, you apply for a position and start working towards the goals specified by your supervisor or group leader. But, did you ever wonder what the histories behind those goals are? How do PIs come up with their research ideas and how do they realise them? What inspires them and how do they pursue and build on their ideas for years and years. How can they successfully maintain their motivation during this long process?
 In this session, we invite you to have an open conversation with world-leading researchers who share their thought processes leading to innovative scientific ideas and are open to all your questions. They will further give you an overview on how they process these ideas and questions until a project is ready to be realised. After a brief introduction from the panelists, they will engage in an active dialogue with the audience. This is a unique opportunity to interact with world-class researchers - and ask them anything!

 


 

CONFERENCE CHAIRS

Alice Geminiani | University of Pavia
Tabea Kirchner | Forschungszentrum Jülich
Paschal Ochang | De Montfort University


PROGRAMME COMMITTEE

Joana Covelo | August Pi i Sunyer Biomedical Research Institute 
Sandra Diaz | Forschungszentrum Jülich
Carmen Lupascu | Italian National Research Council
Taylan Özden | Technical University Darmstadt
Jens Egholm Pedersen | KTH Royal Institute of Technology
Ingrid Reiten | University of Oslo
Alper Yegenoglu | Forschungszentrum Jülich

 

ORGANISER

HBP Education Programme | Medical University Innsbruck
 

CONTACT

education@humanbrainproject.eu