October 6 - 11

EPFL Campus, Lausanne, Switzerland

Understanding the human brain is one of the greatest challenges facing 21st century science. If we can rise to the challenge, we can gain profound insights into what makes us human, develop new treatments for brain disease and build revolutionary new computing technologies.

Today, the convergence between biology and ICT has reached a point at which it can turn the goal of understanding the human brain into a reality. It is this realization that motivates the Human Brain Project – an EU Flagship initiative in which over 80 partners will work together to realize a new "ICT-accelerated" vision for brain research and its applications.

This year will be the Human Brain Project's official kick-off as a Flagship project of the European Union. In addition to meeting of scientists from the HBP's 80+ partner institutions, the programme will include the first meeting of the HBP General Assembly, an international media event, an open-doors poster session for students, researchers, journalists and members of the general public, and a special dinner to celebrate the start of the HBP's 10-year enterprise.

What People are Saying

  • Collaborate, collaborate, collaborate. This is our opportunity.

    Prof. Karlheinz Meier, University of Heidelberg,
    Co-director of the HBP and co-leader of the Neuromorphic Computing Subproject

  • A key goal of the Human Brain Project is to construct realistic simulations of the human brain – this will require molecular and cellular information and from that we will be able to model and understand biological and medical processes. In addition, we will be able to use that information to design and implement new kinds of computers and robotics.

    Prof. Seth Grant, University of Edinburgh,
    Co-leader of the Strategic Mouse Brain data subproject

  • The Human Brain is the most complex system that we know of. We would like to develop some kind of ‘google' brain where we can zoom in and out, see it from different perspectives and understand how brain structure and function is related. The ultimate aim of the Human Brain Project is to understand the human brain. This is only possible when we understand the structural organization of the human brain.

    Prof. Katrin Amunts, Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine,
    Forschungszentrum Jülich

  • The Human Brain Project will be a leader in the creation of new technology for simulation, for visualization and for big data handling in Europe.

    Prof. Thomas Lippert, Institute for Advanced Simulation, Jülich Supercomputing Centre,
    leader of the High Peformance Computing subproject

  • The Human Brain Project will become a major driver of ICT in Europe.

    Prof. Thomas Lippert, Institute for Advanced Simulation, Jülich Supercomputing Centre,
    leader of the High Peformance Computing subproject